Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

If Common Core is state-based why is Uncle Sam pressuring states to accept it?

original article: Schools Threatened by Feds Over Massive Number of Common Core Opt-Outs
August 3, 2015 by REMSO MARTINEZ

From coast to coast, states throughout the country are trying to find any way possible to escape the widespread mess of Common Core. Recently, a large number of Long Island schools were at the center of attention when they reported having the highest number of Common Core opt-outs in the nation. Due to the immense number of students who refused to take place in the intrusive and cumbersome standardized tests, two schools in Long Island risk losing their prized national “Blue Ribbon” award for academic excellence nominations.

As of now, the two schools targeted by the Department of Education are George H. McVey and Quogue elementary schools, who earned their Blue Ribbon nominations based on scores from spring of 2014. However, the actual awards would be given to the schools nominated based on results from the following year’s score next April. This pressure to comply with the Common Core exams means that 12 of the 19 schools nominated for the prestigious award could be taken out of the running due to the opt-outs that have spread throughout the country.

This type of issue is only one piece in a larger part of the culture of corruption brought about by the heavy influence of not only Common Core pushers, but also the Department of Education. A recent Common Core related incident occurred in the past several weeks, where a Harlem principal committed suicide after fabricating the results of her students Common Core exams, all in order to maintain federal funding based on the achievement level of the students.

Parents, students, and even teachers against core curricula and its implementation are the reason so manystates are trying to escape this program. So what is left to do at this point? One path was to help strengthen the option for students to opt-out of the exams; Senator Mike Lee tried to do this at the federal level with an amendment to the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, but that was shot down in the US Senate 32-64. However, a similar amendment authored by Rep. Matt Salmon to the Student Success Act passed the House.

Another more practical and permanent solution would be to keep this issue within the borders of the individual states, since they brought this beast of a program on themselves, it would be best for them to keep it as an in-house issue. Lindsey Burke, a Will Skillman fellow in education policy at the Heritage Foundation, discussed how states could exit from Common Core back in an article for the Daily Signal last April; she stated three main points (for further details on her points, click here):

  1. Determine how the decision was made to cede the state’s standard-setting authority.
  2. Prohibit new spending for standards implementation.
  3. Determine how to reverse course.

Until state governments can come together and realize that the common curricula and excessive, intrusive testing is causing more harm than good, it will depend almost entirely on the grassroots to affect real change by bringing not only awareness, but solutions to the policy table.

Do we want compliance, or a separation between school and state?

bullies, bureaucracy, children, education, extortion, government, ideology, nanny state, oppression, philosophy, politics, public policy, regulation, states rights

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Filed under: bullies, bureaucracy, children, education, extortion, government, ideology, nanny state, oppression, philosophy, politics, public policy, regulation, states rights

Left-leaning journalists not finished with Arizona’s immigration law

MSNBC’s ‘A Nation Divided’ Teeming With Liberal Talking Points
May 26, 2010 by Alex Fitzsimmons

MSNBC’s May 26 special on immigration reform, “A Nation Divided,” was replete with unbalanced interviews with liberal activists and one-sided segments featuring only liberal positions on the controversial issue.

MSNBC anchor Contessa Brewer pitched softballs to Democrats Michael Nowakowski, vice mayor of Phoenix, and Raul Castro, former Arizona governor, without brining on guests to counter their liberal perspectives.

bias, bigotry, border security, discrimination, hate speech, ideology, immigration, indoctrination, legislation, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, public policy, states rights, victimization

Filed under: bias, bigotry, border security, discrimination, hate speech, ideology, immigration, indoctrination, legislation, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, public policy, states rights, victimization

The Left can use Nazi card any time

Furor grows over Arizona’s illegal immigration law
April 26, 2010 by JONATHAN J. COOPER

PHOENIX (AP) – The furor over Arizona’s new law cracking down on illegal immigrants grew Monday as opponents used refried beans to smear swastikas on the state Capitol, civil rights leaders demanded a boycott of the state, and the Obama administration weighed a possible legal challenge.

Activists are planning a challenge of their own, hoping to block the law from taking effect by arguing that it encroaches on the federal government’s authority to regulate immigration and violates people’s constitutional rights by giving police too much power.

Democrats, border security, culture, diversity, government, hate speech, ideology, immigration, left wing, legislation, liberalism, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, politics, protests, public policy, states rights, victimization

Filed under: border security, culture, Democrats, diversity, government, hate speech, ideology, immigration, left wing, legislation, liberalism, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, politics, protests, public policy, states rights, victimization

The 10th Amendment was great idea

The 10th Amendment was great idea
July 25, 2009 by Original America

Should a people blindly trust their government? I worry that as long as Democrats control the Congress and the Presidency the answer is yes. Apparently even disagreeing with Democrats is considered unpatriotic:

Despite all logic, the many calls and efforts for the federal government to take over as much of the private sector as possible seem to be met with little resistance. Thankfully there is growing conservative resistance to federal takeover, a takeover which many Americans would call a Marxist or Socialist movement. This resistance includes grassroots Republicans, Democrats and others alike, all in the name of the Tenth Amendment. This “second revolution” as some call it has spread even to state legislatures and governors, evidenced by their publicly reclaiming the constitutionally recognized sovereignty of their states, also citing the 10th Amendment to the constitution.

10th Amendment, constitution, government, states rights

Filed under: 10th Amendment, constitution, government, states rights

A Party We Can Trust

A Party We Can Trust
July 20, 2009 by Original America

Let’s face it, presently there is no effective difference between the Republican and Democrat parties. The end results of their agendas are essentially the same: moving the United States toward Marxism. The pace at which this tragedy occurs is of little relevance.

Since the 2006 elections, when Democrats took control of both chambers of Congress, it has been widely said the conservative movement is dead. This concept was bolstered with the 2008 elections, with Democrats again picking up more seats in the House and Senate, not to mention the Presidency. For a matter of months after that there were many suggestions the losses suffered by the Republican Party proved it should abandon its conservative base. There were also statements such as “The Reagan era is over.” Thankfully, the left wing narrative does not establish the reality of the situation.

Conservatives have been analyzing and investigating the past two elections as well. Right wing understanding of Republican losses is strikingly different from the left wing calls for Republicans to essentially remake themselves in the image of Democrats. Conservative think tanks, pundits, commentators and the like seem to have reached a consensus on the fact that the nature of the Republican Party is in flux, but there are many theories as to what this actually means.

10th Amendment, constitution, government, freedom, states rights

Filed under: 10th Amendment, constitution, freedom, government, states rights

The 17th Amendment and the Balance of Federal Power

The 17th Amendment and the Balance of Federal Power
July 16, 2009 by Original America

From my grassroots perspective I see a great deal of frustration among conservative voters. Some have given up on the political process by ignoring current events, and some outright refuse to vote any more. In trying to figure out what has exasperated so many grassroots conservatives I believe I have found a common theme. The greatest frustration seems to be so many Republicans appear to be no different from Democrats. True or not, this seems to be the perception.

For many conservatives the idea that Republicans elected to office (federal or state levels) tout their ability to slow the progress of a left wing agenda seems like a shallow victory, at best. Then there are calls for the Republican Party to abandon its conservative origins and embrace a more moderate attitude, which is precisely the approach Senator John McCain employed to lose the 2008 presidential election.

And now with the sprint toward Marxism that has caught the nation there are concerns over where federal power will end, if ever. One question I have is, if federal power continues to usurp individual and states rights, does it matter anymore if Republicans win governorships or seats in Congress?

In any case, the battle to take back our country is, of course, multi-faceted. I have a proposal on the matter.

politics, constitution, states rights, 10th Amendment, government

Filed under: 10th Amendment, constitution, government, politics, states rights

Perry raises possibility of states’ rights showdown with White House over healthcare
July 23, 2009 by DAVE MONTGOMERY

AUSTIN — Gov. Rick Perry, raising the specter of a showdown with the Obama administration, suggested Thursday that he would consider invoking states’ rights protections under the 10th Amendment to resist the president’s healthcare plan, which he said would be “disastrous” for Texas.

Interviewed by conservative talk show host Mark Davis of Dallas’ WBAP/820 AM, Perry said his first hope is that Congress will defeat the plan, which both Perry and Davis described as “Obama Care.” But should it pass, Perry predicted that Texas and a “number” of states might resist the federal health mandate.

government, oppression, constitution, health care, freedom, states righ

Filed under: constitution, freedom, government, health care, oppression, states rights

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