Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

What happens to societies that embrace a right to die?

Holland has been on the bleeding edge of the “right to die” movement, a movement employing Physician Assisted Suicide (PAS). Most people supporting this supposed right have never actually thought through the long term consequences on a grand scale, and that is true of such supporters in the U.S. as well as Europe.

Just last month the DailyMail reported a Dutch doctor killed an elderly patient, a woman over the age of 80. The patient at some earlier time expressed a wish to be euthanized, but later (several times) expressed her desire to live. When the doctor decided it was the “right time” to perform the medicalized killing she drugged the patient without the woman’s knowledge. But the patient unexpectedly awoke during the lethal injection and struggled and resisted so much the doctor asked the family to hold her down. The patient’s right to change her mind seems to have been entirely ignored. Or does the patient even have such a right?

During the court proceedings, the panel charged with handling the matter wanted the case to go to court not to prosecute the doctor, but to have “greater clarity” on the rights of the physician who engages in medicalized killing. Read the full article to see the horrific reasoning used to justify the situation. Those of you who didn’t have your head buried in the sand during the Obamacare debates may remember warnings of “death panels” and other dangers that corrupt health care by allowing elitist government bureaucrats to interfere. Keep in mind, the right to die movement is already here in the U.S. and is growing with the help of various left wing groups.

This is by no means the first incident of PAS where the patient was euthanized against their wishes. But when a society embraces the right to die, with not only the approval but also with the assistance of the state, any person capable of thinking past their own nose should see the obvious problems that will arise. In the name of a persons’s “choice” to die we are seeing government endorsement of medicalized killing without the patient’s consent.

How does government-endorsed medicalized killing go so wrong? Ryan T. Anderson examines this important question in his report Always Care, Never Kill: How Physician-Assisted Suicide Endangers the Weak, Corrupts Medicine, Compromises the Family, and Violates Human Dignity and Equality from March, 2015. It’s a lengthy report but touches on very important issues such as:

  • changing how society deals with the marginalized
  • fundamentally altering the doctor-patient relationship
  • compromising the nature of the family
  • damaging the essential premise of human dignity

It might be funny if this weren’t so serious hearing people pretend to be well informed on this issue while they insulate themselves from the anti-euthanasia side of the debate. When “thinking for yourself” involves intentionally avoiding a view you disagree with (which implies you may not actually know what you disagree with) it becomes a euphemism for not thinking at all. If you claim to care about people you should read the full report. And while you do, think about how compassionate a health care system is when the state is run by enlightened people who think overpopulation is one of the greatest dangers the world faces.

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Doctor who forcibly euthanized elderly woman ‘acted in good faith’

original article: Dutch gov’t panel: Doctor who forcibly euthanized elderly woman ‘acted in good faith’
January 31, 2017 by Claire Chretien

NETHERLANDS, January 31, 2017 (LifeSiteNews) – A Dutch doctor who forcibly euthanized an elderly woman without her consent “acted in good faith,” a euthanasia oversight panel decided when it cleared her of wrongdoing. The chairman of that panel has expressed hope that the case will go to court – not so the doctor can be prosecuted, but so a court can set a precedent on how far doctors may go in such cases.

This particular case was sent to the Regional Review Committee, which oversees the country’s liberal euthanasia regime.

The woman, who was over 80, had dementia. She had allegedly earlier requested to be euthanized when “the time was right” but in her last days expressed her desire to continue living.

Nevertheless, her doctor put a sedative in the patient’s coffee. The doctor then enlisted the help of family members to hold the struggling, objecting patient down so that she could administer the lethal injection.

“I am convinced that the doctor acted in good faith, and we would like to see more clarity on how such cases are handled in the future,” Committee Chairman Jacob Kohnstamm said. Taking the case to court would be “not to punish the doctor, who acted in good faith and did what she had to do, but to get judicial clarity over what powers a doctor has when it comes to the euthanasia of patients suffering from severe dementia.”

Society has “flipped everything completely upside down,” Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, told LifeSiteNews. “This is a prime example of another upside down attitude in the culture.”

“Doesn’t someone have a right to change their mind?” he asked. “They sell it as choice and autonomy, but here’s a woman who’s saying, ‘no, I don’t want it,’ and they stick it in her coffee, they hold her down and lethally inject her.”

“It’s false compassion,” Schadenberg continued. “It’s killing people basically out of a false ideology” that treats euthanasia as somehow good when “it’s the exact opposite of what it actually is.”

“All signs say she didn’t want to die,” he said. “Canadians should take notice of this because this is exactly what we’re debating in Canada.”

A current debate in Canada is, “should they expand euthanasia to people who ask for it in their power of attorney…so if they’re incompetent, they can have euthanasia anyway,” Schadenberg explained.

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If Black Genocide were shown on BET, Black Lives Matter would be attacking abortion clinics

original article: One of Margaret Sanger’s Pals Ran a Concentration Camp That Killed Black People
October 14, 2016 by JASON JONES & JOHN ZMIRAK

It’s a pro-life commonplace that The American Birth Control League, founded by Margaret Sanger 100 years ago and later rechristened Planned Parenthood, had ties to eugenicists and racists. This is not quite right. It’s like saying that the NBA has ties to professional sports. The birth control movement and the eugenics movement were the same movement — to the point where Margaret Sanger twice tried to merge her organization with major eugenics groups.

One eugenics expert, Eugen Fischer, whom Sanger featured as a speaker at a population conference she organized, had already run a concentration camp — in German-ruled Southwest Africa, before World War I, where he murdered, starved and experimented on helpless native Africans. It was Fischer’s book on eugenics, which Hitler had read in prison, that convinced Hitler of its central importance. Another longtime official of Planned Parenthood, Garrett Hardin, had a decades-long track record of serving in eugenics organizations, and as late as the 1980s was calling for mass forced sterilization of Americans as a necessary solution to the “population problem.”

The same people served on the boards of the American Eugenics Society and Sanger’s organizations for decades, and they worked closely together on countless projects — ranging from researching the birth control pill as a means of diminishing the African-American birth rate (they tested the early, hazardous versions of the Pill on impoverished rural women in Puerto Rico), to passing forced sterilization or castration laws in more than a dozen states that targeted blacks and other poor people accused of “feeble mindedness” or “shiftlessness” and diagnosed as “unfit” parents. Today, Planned Parenthood sets up its centers in America’s poorest neighborhoods, and continues to target the same populations via abortion.

Maafa 21: Black Genocide

That’s the appalling truth uncovered in a neglected 2014 documentary which we feature here at The Stream as part of our #100forLife campaign. Maafa 21: Black Genocide gets its odd title from the Swahili word for slavery, and it is this film’s contention that the eugenics movement in America began in the panic which white racists felt at the end of slavery over what should be done to solve what some called the “Negro problem.” It’s a long, harrowing film, which you should watch in small doses — treating it as a miniseries. And keep a box of Kleenex handy, because you will weep.

Produced by the pro-life apostolate Life Dynamics with a mostly black cast of narrators and commentators, this film claims that Planned Parenthood and other organizations and government programs that target the poor and try to block their reproduction are the 21st century’s answer to the Ku Klux Klan — which was founded by white Southern elites to keep down the “unruly” ranks of freed black slaves.

It’s a shocking assertion, but one that the filmmakers prove beyond the shadow of a reasonable doubt, citing name after name, giving racist quote after racist quote, showing that Sanger personally approved the publication of outrageous and cruel claims of the genetic inferiority of millions of Americans, especially blacks, and calling for their forced sterilization, and the cut-off of welfare benefits and even private charity, to stop the “unfit” from reproducing themselves. Then she took part in promoting policies that turned this evil, utopian program of social engineering into binding American laws. One of the leading advocates for the legalization of abortion in the 1960s and 70s was Planned Parenthood, run by her appointees and later by her grandson, Alexander Sanger.

Margaret Sanger Worked with White Supremacists for Decades

The board of Margaret Sanger’s organization and others where she served as an officer, the authors she published in The Birth Control Review, the conferences she sponsored, and the people to whom Planned Parenthood gave awards well into the 1960s and 70s, are a Who’s Who of the ugliest, most paranoid misanthropic elitists and white racists of the 20th century — apart from those who were thankfully hanged at Nuremburg. After those trials, when “eugenics” had acquired a well-deserved taint, these same American elitists used the exaggerated threat of “overpopulation” to peddle the desperate need to control other people’s fertility, if need be by forced sterilization — a policy which Sanger had advocated since 1934.

The eugenicists, self-appointed experts on human quality of life, had peddled their theories not just in Britain and America but in Germany, where they helped to directly inspire Nazi sterilization and extermination programs aimed at the handicapped, Jews, and the small population of black or mixed race Germans — children of French colonial troops whom Hitler considered a grave menace to “Aryan” racial “hygiene.” One of Sanger’s regular authors in The Birth Control Review wrote in a U.S. newspaper in the 1930s defending the forced sterilization of such mixed-race children, for the sake of Germany’s “health.”

Hitler’s Bible, by Sanger’s Friend

Friends and associates of Sanger (such as Harry Laughlin) accepted awards from Nazi-controlled universities, visited with Hitler and Himmler, and boasted that the forced sterilization programs which they had instituted in America were used as models by the Germans. One author who served on Sanger’s board and published regularly in The Birth Control Review was Lothrop Stoddard, a high official of the Massachusetts Ku Klux Klan, whose book The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy, Adolf Hitler cited in Mein Kampf as “my bible.”

Ota_Benga_at_Bronx_Zoo

Nor were the eugenicists isolated cranks. Their ranks include Harvard professors, mainline Protestant clergymen, prominent conservationists for whom entire animal species are named, and Gilded Age plutocrats. Much of the funding for eugenics organizations came from the Carnegie Corporation and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Supreme Court justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, writing his opinion that the forced sterilization of a supposedly “feeble-minded” woman in Virginia was constitutional, infamously said that “three generations of imbeciles are enough.” His views were echoed by President Teddy Roosevelt, as the film proves with quotations. It also recounts how a Sanger ally Madison Grant, a prominent Darwin apostle and eugenicist, helped to exhibit Ota Benga, an African pygmy, in a cage with an orangutan for ten days at New York City’s Bronx Zoo, to “illustrate evolution.” Mr. Benga took his own life ten years later.

The eugenicists’ arrogant certainty that, because they had inherited money and power, they were genetically superior to the rest of the human race, found in Charles Darwin’s theories an ideal pretext and a program: to take the survival of the fittest and make it happen faster, by stopping the “unfit” from breeding. The goal, in Margaret Sanger’s own words, was “More Children from the Fit, Fewer from the Unfit.” Instead of seeing the poor as victims of injustice or targets for Christian charity, the materialism these elitists took from Darwin assured them that the poor were themselves the problem — that they were inferior, deficient and dangerous down to the marrow of their bones.

“Feeble-Minded” and “Shiftless” Blacks

The targets of this campaign in America were poor people, the unemployed, non-English-speaking immigrants, but most of all African-Americans. This vulnerable population, composed largely of ex-slaves and their children, was identified in the 1880s as a “threat” to the “racial health” and progress of the United States, by followers of Francis Galton — first cousin of Charles Darwin, heir to a slave-trading fortune, and inventor of the “science” of eugenics. These people had been exploited for centuries as free labor, denied education for fear of fomenting rebellion, and excluded from most of the economy. Now the eugenicists blamed the victims, black Americans, for their desperate social conditions, claiming that they were the natural result of blacks’ “defective germ plasm,” which posed a threat to America akin to a deadly virus.

The forced sterilization laws which Sanger and her allies passed were used to sterilize at least 60,000 Americans, but perhaps as many as 200,000, on the pretext that young women who became pregnant out of wedlock were “feeble-minded,” “immoral” or “socially useless” parasites — all rhetoric that Sanger personally used in her books, articles, and at least one speech before a Ku Klux Klan rally, as she recounts in her memoir.

tony-riddick-150x150

Maafa 21 interviews Elaine Riddick, who was raped at age 13 and became pregnant. As she lay in the hospital waiting to deliver the baby, welfare officials from the state of North Carolina warned her illiterate grandparents that if they didn’t sign the consent form to have her irreversibly sterilized, the state would cut off their welfare benefits. They scrawled an “X” on the government form, and Elaine was sterilized without her knowledge. She only learned what had been done to her five years later, when welfare officials explained that she was too “feeble-minded” to care for a child “or even tie my own shoes,” as she recounts. Elaine was sterilized in 1968. The last such “eugenic” forced sterilization in the U.S. took place in 1983.

While Elaine never went to high school, she went on and finished college, and the one child which the United States government had permitted her to have — Tony Riddick, a child of rape — now runs his own successful company. Harry Laughlin, the eugenicist who helped pass the law that sterilized Elaine, died without any children.

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Flawed anthropology leads to flawed economics

original article: We’re all Dead: How J.M. Keynes – And His Critics – Went Wrong
June 29, 2016 by Liz Crandell

“Critics of John Maynard Keynes were so determined his economics were wrong that they allowed Keynes to dictate the terms of the debate,” says Victor Claar, professor of economics at Henderson State University, in his Acton University lecture. He continues to describe Keynes flawed anthropology with respect to classical economists and the Great Depression. Key observations of human nature include the principles of work, property, exchange, and division of labor. We can survive and prosper, take ownership of our work, support and rely on each other through exchange, and specialize in exchange at an opportunity cost. Furthermore, these observations are linked to moral imperatives.

Work allows us to combat sloth, we can practice good stewardship, serve other people, and provide richer options for all. Keynes, who was focused on how consumption worked rather than what human life looked like, did not understand these things. Maynard, like his father, Neville, was a large proponent of the Cambridge method, and the distinctions between positive and normative economics laid out by John Stuart Mills. The great legacy and wide scope of this method still exists today, as most economists continue to try and steer clear of normative statements, and try to stick to descriptive value judgments. However, by the nature of the problems we face, dealing with poverty, unemployment, and development, we inherently deal with positive statements and issues.

Supporters of Keynes’ theories use The Great Depression and post-World War eras as evidence of their effectiveness. Claar grants insight into the attractiveness of such policies, saying that such a recession created pessimism about the ability of market forces to self-correct, and since government management worked “reasonably well” after World War I, state management became tempting again. There is fault in this, since Keynes “focuses on the inherent instability of the market and the need for active policy intervention to achieve full employment of resources and sustained growth.” Keynes maintains that recessions and high unemployment are due to the fact that firms and consumers in the private sector do not spend enough on new capital and equipment and goods and services due to insecurity and nervousness about the future. As such, the remedy lies in the public sector, with the government spending using deficit financing if necessary. Ideally, after people get back to work, revenues will increase and the budget will balance once more. The obvious downside to this thought is that reducing pain in the short run, putting a band aid on the problem, leads to inflation and slower rates of long-term growth. Claar draws students’ attention to a revealing quote from Keynes that creates a moral dilemma: “In the long run, we’re all dead.” Keynes is perfectly happy to allow future generations pay off the debt that his creates.

Claar concludes there are three keys to understanding Keynes: The classical model’s predicted equilibria are mere special cases and are rarely satisfied in practice; hubris, or that the State is more capable of managing the economy that we ourselves are; and consumption is the purpose of all economic activity. This “flawed anthropology leads to flawed economics,” and “caught hold in the same period that men and women of science began to believe that systematic management of human beings was both possible and useful in all areas of society.” Keynes himself declared eugenics to be “the most important, significant and, I would add, genuine branch of sociology which exists.” Claar leaves students with a hopeful message that we can combat this dangerous line of thinking with well-functioning markets that let prices send strong signals to all of us regarding where our services may be needed most by others; clearly defined and enforced property rights that lead to good stewardship; and influential institutions, such as churches and families, to share wisdom.

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Doctors give up on post-traumatic patient, how about euthanasia?

original article: Sex abuse victim in her 20s allowed to choose euthanasia in Holland after doctors decided her post-traumatic stress and other conditions were incurable
May 10, 2016 by STEVE DOUGHTY

A former victim of child sex abuse has ended her life under Dutch euthanasia laws because she could not live with her mental suffering.

The woman, in her twenties, was given a lethal injection after doctors and psychiatrists decided that her post-traumatic stress disorder and other conditions were incurable.

It went ahead despite improvements in the woman’s psychological condition after ‘intensive therapy’ two years ago, and even though doctors in the Netherlands accept that a demand for death from a psychiatric patient may be no more than a cry for help.

The woman, who has not been named, began to suffer from mental disorders 15 years ago following sexual abuse, according to the papers released by the Dutch Euthanasia Commission. The timescale means she was abused between the ages of five and 15.

News of her death angered anti-euthanasia MPs and disability campaigners in Britain. One Labour MP said it meant sex abuse victims were now being punished with death.

It comes at a time of continued controversy over assisted dying in Britain. A steady flow of people from this country travel to die legally at the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, and judges and the courts appear to be leaning in favour of making it legal to help someone to die.

Details of the Dutch case were released by authorities anxious to justify euthanasia laws and to demonstrate that mercy killings are carried out under full and correct medical supervision.

The papers said that the woman, who was killed last year, had post-traumatic stress disorder that was resistant to treatment. Her condition included severe anorexia, chronic depression and suicidal mood swings, tendencies to self-harm, hallucinations, obsessions and compulsions.

She also had physical difficulties and was almost entirely bedridden. Her psychiatrist said ‘there was no prospect or hope for her. The patient experienced her suffering as unbearable’.

However, the papers also disclosed that two years before her death the woman’s doctors called for a second opinion, and on the advice of the new doctors she had an intensive course of trauma therapy. ‘This treatment was temporarily partially successful,’ the documents said.

Treatment was abandoned last year after independent consultants were called in and said the case was hopeless.

The consultants also said that despite her ‘intolerable’ physical and mental suffering, chronic depression and mood swings, she was entirely competent to make the decision to take her own life.

The patient, they said, was ‘totally competent’ and there was ‘no major depression or other mood disorder which affected her thinking’. A final GP’s report approved the ‘termination of life’ order and the woman was killed by an injection of lethal drugs, the report said.

In Britain yesterday her case was condemned as ‘horrendous’ by Labour MP Robert Flello.

He said: ‘It almost sends the message that if you are the victim of abuse, and as a result you get a mental illness, you are punished by being killed, that the punishment for the crime of being a victim is death.

‘It serves to reinforce why any move towards legalising assisted suicide, or assisted dying, is so dangerous.’

Tory MP Fiona Bruce, chairman of the Parliamentary All-Party Pro-Life Group, said: ‘This tragic situation shows why euthanasia should never be legalised in this country. What this woman needed, at a desperate point in her young life, was help and support to overcome her problems, not the option of euthanasia.’

Nikki Kenward, of the disability rights group Distant Voices, said: ‘It is both horrifying and worrying that mental health professionals could regard euthanasia in any form as an answer to the complex and deep wounds that result from sexual abuse.’

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Euthanasia continues to grow more popular

original article: In Europe, People are Being Euthanized Just Because They’re Autistic
March 10, 2016 CONOR BECK

Euthanasia laws in the Netherlands are very liberal, leaving not only physically ill but also mentally ill patients vulnerable to assisted suicide.

In one case in the Netherlands recently, this resulted in death for a depressed patient with autism. The Washington Post report on this disturbing case shows that Holland’s Regional Euthanasia Review Committees “almost never find fault” with “mercy killings.”

In a recent case, a 30-something patient with autism was labeled “treatable” by one Dutch doctor, but after one more year his request to be killed was approved. The patient was administered a fatal combination of drugs, though the man’s only diagnosis was autism, according to the report. Doctors said the man had been neglected and abused as a child, which also could have been a factor in his wish to die.

The man was one of 110 people to be euthanized for mental disorders between 2011 and 2014 in the country, according to the report. This is a tremendously high number, especially given that the country’s population is nearly 20 times smaller than the United States’.

Columbia University psychiatrist Paul S. Appelbaum writes that widespread euthanasia access is “inducing hopelessness among other individuals with similar conditions and removing pressure for an improvement in psychiatric and social services.”

Appelbaum chairs the World Psychiatric Association’s ethics committee and is planning to address the issue this month.

In the Post article, Charles Lane says, “Once the Netherlands authorized euthanasia for physical illnesses in 2002, demands to extend this ‘right’ to the suffering mentally ill were inevitable and, indeed, logically consistent.”

Assisted suicide also is facing increased access in Canada, with pressure to include that access to patients with mental illness.

In a column at LifeNews, Wesley Smith listed the proposed guidelines for Canada’s new assisted suicide laws:

  • Death on demand for those with medically diagnosed serious sicknesses;
  • Death on demand for those with disabilities;
  • Death on demand for those with medically diagnosed mental illnesses.
  • Death on demand for “mature” children with the above conditions, perhaps with parental consent required;
  • Nurses ordered to participate in euthanasia under the direction of a doctor, normalizing killing as an answer to suffering and making it easier for doctors to avoid the dirty work of homicide;
  • Government-paid euthanasia.

The assisted suicide push also continues in the United States. In October, California became the fourth state to legalize doctor-prescribed suicide.

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Another country busted for euthanizing without consent

original article: Head of Nurses Group Reveals Doctors are Euthanizing Patients Without Consent
March 8, 2016 by MICHAEL COOK

The head of Portugal’s national nurses’ association has blown the whistle on covert euthanasia in public hospitals. Ana Rita Cavaco told a radio program that she personally had heard doctors discussing the topic.

She declared on the Catholic station Rádio Renascença, that euthanasia “is sometimes practiced in the health service hospitals, with doctors suggesting this solution for some patients”.

“I have personally witnessed such situations – I don’t need to look for further examples. I have seen cases where doctors have suggested administering insulin to induce an insulin coma. I am not going to shock anybody as everyone who works in the health service knows these things happen out of sight and sound, so let’s talk about it openly.”

She gave no details, but the mere suggestion was enough for Portugal’s national medical association to demand that she be prosecuted for alleging that doctors were participating in an illegal activity. The association declared that Portuguese should have complete confidence in doctors.

“These statements cannot be passed over in silence with the swiftness with which they were uttered. They are libelous and undermine the dignity of doctors and nurses, so it must be proven or clearly and formally denied”.

The Health Ministry has ordered an urgent inquiry into the allegations.

The controversy comes at a sensitive time in Portugal as Parliament will probably debate euthanasia later this year, after a high-profile petition secured enough signatures to bring the matter before the legislature

LifeNews Note: Michael Cook is editor of MercatorNet where this story appeared.

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The natural next step after legalizing assisted suicide

original article: Canada Proposes Forcing Doctors and Nurses to Euthanize Patients
March 7, 2016 by Wesley Smith

I have never seen a society jump so enthusiastically into the abyss that is the culture of death as Canada has in the last year.

Once the Supreme Court ended the assisted suicide debate by fiat, euthanasia boosters stopped pretending to want a limited death license and let their true agenda out.

Based on government and medical association proposed guidelines, Canada’s euthanasia regime will soon include:

  • Death on demand for those with medically diagnosed serious sicknesses;
  • Death on demand for those with disabilities;
  • Death on demand for those with  medically diagnosed mental illnesses.
  • Death on demand for “mature” children with the above conditions, perhaps with parental consent required;
  • Nurses ordered to participate in euthanasia under the direction of a doctor, normalizing killing as an answer to suffering and making it easier for doctors to avoid the dirty work of homicide;
  • Government-paid euthanasia.

There will also, apparently, be no effective conscience exemptions for religious or morally opposed doctors, nurses, and religious medical institutions–even though Canada’s governing Charter explicitly protects “freedom of religion and conscience.”

Doctors will be legally required to offer “effective referral” for patients who want to be killed.

Nurses ordered to kill a patient by a doctor will have no options to resist other than active insubordination.

Religious facilities will be required by law to permit euthanasia on premises if they receive public money–which includes most facilities as Canada has a socialized, single-payer health financing system. No escape.

This authoritarianism is the subject of my current First Things article, in which I urge dissenting medical professionals to take the hard course of peaceful civil disobedience rather than acquiesce to the culture of death, or simply quit. From, “Canada Declares War on Christian Doctors and Nurses:”

The difficult but most righteous course would be to engage in a policy of total non-cooperation with the culture of death, forcing the national and provincial governments and medical colleges either to turn a blind eye or to inflict unjust punishments on doctors for refusing to kill.

Perhaps such Draconian measures would bring the country to its senses.

I also offer this faint hope for heading off the looming religious oppression brewing in Canada:

Some notable Canadian prelates and other faith leaders have spoken out strongly against the pending coercion. But in Canada’s highly secularized society, it will probably require louder voices than these—for example those of Pope Francis and the Dalai Lama—to turn the tide.

But the hour is very late. The embarrassment caused by the wildly popular pope condemning a nation that considers itself the epitome of reasonableness might be the only preventative measure that can save religious liberty in what used to be the free country of Canada.

And here’s another sobering thought: Canada is the US’s closest cultural cousin. What happens in Canada, may not stay north of the 49th Parallel.

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Looking at the broader impact of assisted suicide

original article: Commentary: Assisted suicide corrupts medicine
March 6, 2016 by Ryan T. Anderson

Physician-assisted suicide is often portrayed as a compassionate option for clear-thinking adults to end their lives peacefully. But the reality is much darker. Letting doctors prescribe deadly drugs can actually encourage acts of violence, often resulting from subtle social and psychological coercion. Physician-assisted suicide fundamentally changes the doctor-patient relationship, how medicine is practiced, and how society views the poor, elderly or disabled.

This is why it’s so disconcerting that so many states are considering allowing physician-assisted suicide.

Assisted suicide denies the equal worth and dignity of every human life.

Indeed, several disability-rights groups argue in a joint legal brief that “assisted suicide sets up a double standard for how health care providers, government authorities, and others respond to an individual’s stated wish to die. Some people get suicide prevention while others get suicide assistance, and the difference between the two groups is the health status of the individual.” How’s that respecting equality? It undermines solidarity.

As for those physically or mentally unable to make an explicit request? The evidence from Europe is disconcerting. It shows that assisted suicide quickly leads to involuntary euthanasia.

In the Netherlands, several government-sponsored surveys have disclosed that in thousands of cases, doctors have intentionally administered lethal injections to patients without their consent. In 2013, the High Court of Ireland gave voice to this sad reality: “The incidence of legally assisted death without explicit request in the Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland is strikingly high.”

Euthanasia also can lead to infanticide. A Netherlands commission argued in 2013 that as many as 650 infants per year should be eligible for euthanasia on the basis of the children’s “poor prognosis and very poor expected quality of life.” The U.N. Human Rights Committee formally condemned this: “The Committee is gravely concerned at reports that new-born handicapped infants have had their lives ended by medical personnel.”

Once you go down the road of saying some lives should be eligible for assisted suicide, the lethal logic is clear. Mary Warnock, a leading ethicist in the United Kingdom, has argued, “If you’re demented, you’re wasting people’s lives — your family’s lives — and you’re wasting the resources of the National Health Service.” Warnock went on to suggest that such people have a “duty to die.”

Dr. Herbert Hendin, a leading scholar on assisted suicide, notes that a study of Dutch hospitals found that “doctors and nurses reported that more requests for euthanasia came from families than from patients themselves. The investigator concluded that the families, the doctors, and the nurses were involved in pressuring patients to request euthanasia.” The legal safeguards inevitably fail.

Physician-assisted suicide offers a cheap, quick-fix solution in a world of increasingly scarce health care resources.

Perhaps this is why more or less every professional medical association, including the American Medical Association, the American Nurses Association, and the World Health Organization, opposes assisted suicide. The AMA states: “Physician-assisted suicide is fundamentally incompatible with the physician’s role as healer.”

Dr. Paul McHugh of Johns Hopkins Hospital explains what happens when this boundary is crossed: “Once doctors agree to assist a person’s suicide, ultimately they find it difficult to reject anyone who seeks their services. The killing of patients by doctors spreads to encompass many treatable but mentally troubled individuals, as seen today in the Netherlands, Belgium and Switzerland.”

And Dr. Leon Kass of the University of Chicago elaborates on this point: “Physician-assisted suicide will pervert the medical profession by transforming the healer of human beings into a technical dispenser of death. For over two millennia the medical ethic, mindful that power to cure is also power to kill, has held as an inviolable rule, ‘Doctors must not kill.’”

Human life need not be extended by every medical intervention possible, but a person should never be intentionally killed. Doctors may help patients to die a dignified death from natural causes and should administer palliative care, but that is very different from doctors killing patients or helping them kill themselves. This is the reality that such euphemisms as “death with dignity” and “aid in dying” seek to conceal.

Americans must insist that no one, especially a doctor, be permitted to intentionally kill, or assist in intentionally killing, an innocent person.

abuse, civil rights, corruption, eugenics, government, health care, medicine, nanny state, tragedy, unintended consequences

Filed under: abuse, civil rights, corruption, eugenics, government, health care, medicine, nanny state, tragedy, unintended consequences

Just call it ‘potential marriage’

Two contemporary issues are converging more potently than ever before: homosexuality and abortion. How so?

First, unless you’ve been missing in action for a while you’re well aware of the recent push to legally compel religious people to violate their conscience on matters of what marriage means.

So you think you know what objections to gay marriage are all about?

Gay Marriage Isn’t About Justice, It’s About Selma Envy

When did ‘tolerance’ start to mean punishing people for their beliefs?

Law firms willing to work with companies dealing in tobacco, pollution, and murder – but not traditional marriage

Religious conservatives are the targets of discrimination, lawyer says

Age of intolerance: What the Indiana pizza attacks tell us about free speech

There are those who would construe the issue as though declining a customer asking for a wedding cake for a gay wedding is the same as preventing the ceremony from happening (despite the fact there is another baker just down the street who would do the job). Absurd, yes, and false, and dishonest, sure, but emotionally satisfying for those willing to lie to push for the gay agenda. What’s really going on here is not anti-gay hate but anti-religious hate. And not merely hate, we are now faced with a situation where not only are religious people being legally forced to violate their religious beliefs but this situation is also one where a constitutional right (blatantly spelled out in the US Constitution) is being entirely disregarded for a different agenda. As it stands, the law can compel people to violate their conscience if their conscience is of a religious nature.

But there is another area of life where moral objections to involving oneself in certain controversial acts are challenged.

ACLU sues feds in bid to make Catholic groups provide abortion to illegal immigrants

Twelve Nurses Forced to Take Part in Abortions

Kill or Get Out of Medicine: What Canada And Australia Tell Pro-Life Doctors

So now the situation includes forcing people to either fund or participate in abortions, despite moral objections.

What connects these issues? Conscientious objection. It’s worth mentioning conscientious objection to war and the draft was a very popular thing in the 1970s. Moral conscience was treated as a valid reason to change the law. But on the issue of being forced to participate in or contribute a gay wedding or being forced to participate in or contribute to an abortion, these objections tend to be motivated by religious beliefs. And somehow being of a religious nature makes these objections invalid.

So what can be done about this obvious double standard? An idea is already provided.

You’ve probably heard the term “potential person” being used in defense of abortion rights. But did you know that same term is being used to expand abortion rights to kill infants as well?

Modern Babykilling

Infanticide on Demand

Murder of Newborn Babies in Infanticide as Bad as Abortion

The three stories linked above are all about the same instance of a paper published by medical experts claiming infants are not “persons” yet, they are merely “potential persons”. Now it’s bad enough to claim we don’t know when life begins and then deny personhood to a child in the womb and all civil rights including the right to life (pretending we actually knew the child is NOT a person). But, and I can’t believe I’m about to say this, there is actually something worse: denying a recently born child personhood and all civil rights – including the right to life.

You thought eugenics died with the Nazis? You were wrong. And, of course, we are subjected to further distortion of language and logic trying to justify medicalized killing:

Alberto Giubilini and Francesca Minerva are associated respectively with Monash University, in Melbourne, Australia, and with the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, at the University of Melbourne.

They argue that both the fetus and the new-born infant are only potential persons without any interests. Therefore the interests of the persons involved with them are paramount until some indefinite time after birth. To emphasise the continuity between the two acts, they term it “after-birth abortion” rather than infanticide.

Their conclusions may shock but Guibilini and Minerva assert them very confidently. “We claim that killing a newborn could be ethically permissible in all the circumstances where abortion would be. Such circumstances include cases where the newborn has the potential to have an (at least) acceptable life, but the well-being of the family is at risk.” This assertion highlights another aspect of their argument. Killing an infant after birth is not euthanasia either. In euthanasia, a doctor would be seeking the best interests of the person who dies. But in “after-birth abortion” it is the interests of people involved, not the baby.

The astoundingly evil thing of killing children is often justified by pretending we know things we really don’t know and inventing new distinctions without real differences (medicalized killing is medicalized killing, I don’t care if the killing is done with the interests of the people involved instead of the presumptuous interests of the baby). Science cannot answer the question of when life beings, and it certainly can’t tell us when personhood begins. Science is not equipped to answer questions like these. That’s where philosophy comes in. But abortion rights advocates cop out on these questions, too, by arguing we don’t have to know the answers to these questions – we can simply ignore them by calling the child a “potential person” or the even more ridiculous term “pre-person people“. And you know what, these semantic games have worked for them pretty well so far. Why don’t we give it a try.

I propose we start calling gay marriage “potential marriage”. I don’t suggest this as a genuine position; I mean it as a means of bringing more attention to the asinine semantic game being played already in the intellectually and morally fraudulent defense of abortion. We, the defenders of children inside and outside the womb, should make the case that western society’s standard for what qualifies as injustice has been convoluted and insubstantiated and entirely undercut by pretending the killing of children merely for someone else’s convenience is a civil right. If killing babies is not evil I’m not sure how we can call anything evil. If killing children (the most innocent of us) for other people’s convenience is not injustice how can we call anything injustice?

By what standard can we say declining to bake a cake for a gay wedding is injustice when we praise the killing of children and trash those to speak out against it?

Let’s put the gay mafia and abortion mafia on defense. Call gay marriage “potential marriage” and see how they try to defend a double standard when we use their own propaganda against them. They want to play semantic games. Fine, let’s play.

abortion, anti-religion, babies, bigotry, bullies, children, eugenics, extremism, fraud, health care, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, pandering, political correctness, progressive, propaganda, public policy, relativism, scientists

Filed under: abortion, anti-religion, babies, bigotry, bullies, children, eugenics, extremism, fraud, health care, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, pandering, political correctness, progressive, propaganda, public policy, relativism, scientists

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