Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

How Much Does Poverty Drive Crime?

August 22, 2014 by JOE CARTER

I’m about to make a prediction that is incontrovertible — a claim that cannot be controverted because (a) I am absolutely right in my prediction, and (b) because I will be long dead before my rightness can be proven.

Here’s what I predict: By the year 2114 social scientists will have established with 90 percent confidence that the “root cause” of the majority of the social maladies we experienced in the early twenty-first century (i.e., right now) were attributable to family structure, family dynamics, or family culture.

A trend in that direction appears to already be underway. Consider, for example, research recently published in the British Journal of Psychiatry that studied more than half a million children born in Sweden between 1989 and 1993. The results of the study showed that children of parents in the lowest income quintile experienced an increased risk of being convicted of violent criminality and substance abuse compared with peers in the highest quintile. No real surprise there. What was unexpected was the conclusion: “There were no associations between childhood family income and subsequent violent criminality and substance misuse once we had adjusted for unobserved familial risk factors.”

As The Economist explains, for “families which had started poor and got richer, the younger children—those born into relative affluence—were just as likely to misbehave when they were teenagers as their elder siblings had been. Family income was not, per se, the determining factor.”

This finding shouldn’t be all that surprising for anyone who has spent much time around people in poverty. Lack of money is certainly a problem for those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder, but it’s rarely the cause of people engaging in criminal behavior. All poor people share a common trait — they lack sufficient income and/or wealth — but they don’t all share a propensity for criminality. Why then is crime more prevalent in poverty-stricken areas?

The reason is that people in areas of high poverty tend to lack access to strong institutions that can compensate for broken family structures, dysfunctional family dynamics, or pathological family cultures. Overcoming the effects of a having a messed up family are difficult enough when you have both money and institutional resources, like functioning school systems and locally-engaging churches. But if you have nothing else to rely on but family and that fails, you are likely to fail too.

While I’m generally a believer in self-determination, I believe family is the one factor that is more likely than any other to determine whether an individual flourishes or fails. It’ll likely take another hundred years before social science confirms my conviction. But I’m hoping by then our society — or at least the subset who consider themselves to be conservatives — will finally recognize that the most important institution in need of conservation is the family.

original article: How Much Does Poverty Drive Crime?

children, criminal, crisis, culture, demographics, economics, education, ethics, family, ideology, poverty, study, victimization

Filed under: children, criminal, crisis, culture, demographics, economics, education, ethics, family, ideology, poverty, study, victimization

CBS and AP publish racist picture of Obama; NAACP silent

CBS and AP Photoshop Racist Picture of Obama
November 4, 2010 by Noel Sheppard

What exactly were CBS and the Associated Press’s intentions by creating this picture published at CBSNews.com Wednesday (h/t Creative Minority Report via Ace):

As one can see, the darker Obama is on the left with the Democrats, and the lighter Obama is on the right with the Republicans.

Are CBS and AP not so subtly implying the GOP are all white?

As Matthew Archbold pointed out at CMR:

How could anyone think that changing the President’s skin tone like this would be a good idea? This has got to be either one of the most racially insensitive and just plain ol’ stupid photoshops a major news organization has done since Time Magazine blackened OJ Simpson’s face. The idiocy of this is only heightened by the fact that Obama’s heritage is mixed.

Indeed. Seems like someone at AP and CBS has some splainin’ to do.

bias, bigotry, culture, demographics, diversity, hate speech, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, politics, propaganda, racism, racist

Filed under: bias, bigotry, culture, demographics, diversity, hate speech, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, politics, propaganda, racism, racist

Support for Health Care Plan Falls to New Low

Health Care Reform
Support for Health Care Plan Falls to New Low

November 23, 2009 by Rasmussen (hat tip to Gateway Pundit)

Just 38% of voters now favor the health care plan proposed by President Obama and congressional Democrats. That’s the lowest level of support measured for the plan in nearly two dozen tracking polls conducted since June.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 56% now oppose the plan.

Half the survey was conducted before the Senate voted late Saturday to begin debate on its version of the legislation. Support for the plan was slightly lower in the half of the survey conducted after the Senate vote.

approval ratings, culture, demographics, government, health care, legislation, nanny state, politics, reform, regulation

Filed under: approval ratings, culture, demographics, government, health care, legislation, nanny state, politics, reform, regulation

Someone in MSM finally distinguishes ‘illegal’ immigration

A curious observation here. After years of stories on how controversial “immigration” is, there is the occasional news report that acknowledges the real controversy is over illegal immigration, not all immigration. But look at the context in which this story finds it necessary to make the distinction. It’s almost as if this left wing National Socialist Movement appears to be portrayed as a right wing extremist group.

Neo-Nazi Rallies Provoke ‘Anger, Fear’
November 7, 2009 by Steven Cuevas

The National Socialist Movement, a neo-Nazi group, is holding two rallies in Arizona and Minnesota on Saturday to demonstrate against illegal immigration. Similar rallies in Riverside, Calif., near Los Angeles, have led to violent clashes with counter-protesters.

bias, bigotry, demographics, discrimination, diversity, extremism, free speech, hate speech, ideology, immigration, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, organizations, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, protests, racism, racist, socialism, tolerance

Filed under: bias, bigotry, demographics, discrimination, diversity, extremism, free speech, hate speech, ideology, immigration, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, organizations, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, protests, racism, racist, socialism, tolerance

Democrats want to count illegals in census

Senate blocks census US-citizenship question
November 5, 2009 by ANDREW TAYLOR (hat tip to Lux Libertas)

WASHINGTON – Senate Democrats have blocked a GOP attempt to require next year’s census forms to ask people whether they are a U.S. citizen.

The proposal by Louisiana Republican Sen. David Vitter was aimed at excluding immigrants from the population totals that are used to figure the number of congressional representatives for each state. Critics said Vitter’s plan would discourage immigrants from responding to the census and would be hugely expensive. They also said that it’s long been settled law that the apportionment of congressional seats is determined by the number of people living in each state, regardless of whether they are citizens. A separate survey already collects the data.

The plan fell after a 60-39 procedural vote made it ineligible for attachment to a bill funding the census.

Democrats, congress, corruption, demographics, elections, ethics, fraud, government, law, left wing, legislation, legislature, liberalism, political correctness, politics, public policy, relativism, scandal, voter fraud

Filed under: congress, corruption, Democrats, demographics, elections, ethics, fraud, government, law, left wing, legislation, legislature, liberalism, political correctness, politics, public policy, relativism, scandal, voter fraud

Forgotten Foot Soldiers In War On Success
politics, socialism, marxism, left wing, demographics, funding, government, ideology, philosophy, liberalism, taxes

October 2, 2008, by BRAD O’LEARY

When writing my latest book, “The Audacity of Deceit: Barack Obama’s War on American Values,” I discovered a relatively unknown constituency: the 30% of American voters who do not pay federal income taxes.

These Americans are exempt from paying income taxes either because their income level is below the threshold that would require them to pay, or their total deductions leave them with no income-tax liability.

So I set out to determine exactly who these people are and what makes them tick. In conjunction with Zogby America, I conducted a series of carefully orchestrated polls. For more results than I can write about here, you’ll have to buy my book or go to http://www.BarackObamaTest.com.

Filed under: demographics, funding, government, ideology, left wing, liberalism, marxism, philosophy, politics, socialism, taxes

Semantics Lesson: On the Meaning of ‘Moderate’ and ‘Bipartisan’
politics, left wing, propaganda, Democrats, political correctness, conservative, columns, demographics, ideology, liberalism, philosophy

January 17, 2008, by Ross Mackenzie

When they start throwing words like “moderate” and “bipartisan” at you, the best thing to do is duck.

Let’s begin with a semantics lesson and some facts.

Filed under: columns, conservative, Democrats, demographics, ideology, left wing, liberalism, philosophy, political correctness, politics, propaganda

How The Bradley Effect Blew Up The New Hampshire Polling
politics, elections, news media, demographics, political correctness, columns

January 11, 2008, by John Hawkins

There’s still a lot of debate about what went wrong with the polling in New Hampshire. Personally? With the benefit of hindsight, I think that it’s clearly, unequivocally the Bradley Effect at work.

Let’s cover the bases on why I think that’s so.

Filed under: columns, demographics, elections, news media, political correctness, politics

Democrats wake up to being the party of the rich
politics, Democrats, wealthy, elections, demographics

November 4, 2007, Michael Franc

A legislative proposal that was once on the fast track is suddenly dead. The Senate will not consider a plan to extract billions in extra taxes from mega-millionaire hedge fund managers.

Democrats now control the majority of the nation’s wealthiest congressional jurisdictions. More than half of the wealthiest households are concentrated in the 18 states where Democrats control both Senate seats.

This new political demography holds true in the House of Representatives, where the leadership of each party hails from different worlds. Nancy Pelosi, Democratic leader of the House of Representatives, represents one of America’s wealthiest regions. Her San Francisco district has more than 43,700 high-end households. Fewer than 7,000 households in the western Ohio district of House Republican leader John Boehner enjoy this level of affluence.

Filed under: Democrats, demographics, elections, favorite, politics, wealthy

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