Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

Homeschoolers take on Common Core reforms

July 10, 2014 by Michael D. Clark

Long before eight states began rejecting Common Core school reforms, the sweeping new academic standards were considered enemy combatants in Lesley Hodge’s Loveland home.

A former attorney and mother of a home-schooled teenager, Hodge is hard pressed to limit her criticism of the educational changes hitting Ohio public schools with full force in the coming school year.

But she is laser focused on the single largest impact Common Core will have on her daughter and the 1.8 million students ā€“ 3.5 percent of all American K-12 students ā€“ whose parents eschew public and private schools for home instruction.

Initially, Common Core will have little impact on home-schooled students.

But in a few years, when home-schooled teens walk side-by-side with public high school students into ACT and SAT college examination rooms, they may be at a distinct disadvantage for not having studied a Common Core curricula.

“Common Core standards drive curriculum, curriculum drives testing ā€¦ Children will be taught to the test and it affects us home-schoolers because our children have to take those same college entrance exams as everybody else,” said Hodge as she joined thousands of area families at a recent home schooling convention in downtown Cincinnati.

“Everything will boil down to what (home-schoolers) provide on a test and then that will determine where they go to college and I believe that … (at) some point, some committee will say, ‘Well, your child shouldn’t have this career because your child is not qualified.’ ”

read full article: Homeschoolers take on Common Core reforms

bureaucracy, children, education, government, nanny state, political correctness, public policy, reform, regulation, unintended consequences

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Filed under: bureaucracy, children, education, government, nanny state, political correctness, public policy, reform, regulation, unintended consequences

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