Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

How to win elections

True or not, a tale for those who actually think about real life.

“We are worried about ‘the cow’ when it is all about the ‘Ice Cream.’

The most eye-opening civics lesson I ever had was while teaching third grade this year.

The presidential election was heating up and some of the children showed an interest. I decided that we would have an election for a class president.

We would choose our nominees. They would make a campaign speech and the class would vote. To simplify the process, candidates were nominated by other class members. We discussed what kinds of characteristics these students should have.

We got many nominations and from those, Jamie and Olivia were picked to run for the top spot. The class had done a great job in their selections. Both candidates were good kids.

I thought Jamie might have an advantage because he got lots of parental support. I had never seen Olivia’s mother.

The day for their speeches arrived.

Jamie went first. He had specific ideas about how to make our class a better place. He ended by promising to do his very best. Everyone applauded and he sat down.

Now is was Olivia’s turn to speak. Her speech was concise. She said, “If you vote for me, I will give you ice cream.”
She sat down. The class went wild. “Yes! Yes! We want ice cream”

She surely would say more. She did not have to.

A discussion followed. How did she plan to pay for the ice cream? She wasn’t sure. Would her parents buy it or would the class pay for it? She didn’t know. The class really didn’t care. All they were thinking about was ice cream.

Jamie was forgotten. Olivia won by a landslide.

Every time Barack Obama opened his mouth he offered ice cream and 52 percent of the people reacted like nine year olds. They want ice cream. The other 48 percent know they’re going to have to feed the cow and clean up the mess.

This is the ice cream Obama promised us!

Remember, the government cannot give — anything to anyone — that they have not first taken away from someone else.

Did you vote for the ice cream in 2008? Remember this: November 2, 2012 is Take Out the Trash Day!

campaign, culture, elections, funding, government, pandering, propaganda, spending

Filed under: campaign, culture, elections, funding, government, pandering, propaganda, spending

News media think American people are dumb, prefer the political class

Michelle Bachmann has been getting a lot of grief from our impartial news media of late. But it is interesting to see what the media are pushing.

Gregory Scolds Bachmann for Listening to Public Opinion on Debt Ceiling
August 14, 2011 by Noel Sheppard

It appears David Gregory is a bit confused about how our system of government works.

During intense questioning of Congresswoman Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) on Sunday’s “Meet the Press,” the host scolded his guest for having the nerve to actually care what the American people thought about raising the debt ceiling (video follows with transcript and commentary):

read full article and see the video

CNN’s Candy Crowley Insists to Michele Bachmann That She’s ‘Outside the Mainstream’
August 15, 2011 by Tim Graham

On her Sunday interview show State of the Union, CNN host Candy Crowley pushed Michele Bachmann hard from the left, suggesting her stance on the debt ceiling is “outside the mainstream” of political society. Touting a CBS-New York Times poll which found the Tea Party were losing popularity among Republicans, she added, “we have a poll where the majority of Americans said you all need to compromise on this debt ceiling, you all need to raise the debt ceiling, and it out to be — the deal ought to include a combination of tax increases and spending cuts. You are opposed to both raising the debt ceiling and that kind of compromise. So doesn’t that put you outside the mainstream?”

Bachmann said “absolutely not” to that pushy question:

BACHMANN: Oh goodness, absolutely not. I haven’t gone…

CROWLEY: Even if most people disagree?

BACHMANN: I have not gone one place in Iowa or South Carolina or New Hampshire where anyone has said, please, raise my taxes they are not high enough already. Never happens. And people, I will almost every event I go to, and we don’t poll in just certain people, it’s open to the public, people are not there saying raise the debt ceiling, we want you to borrow more money. It doesn’t happen, Candy.

People are very upset and nervous about where the economy is at now. And what we saw yesterday in the straw poll, people in Iowa sent a message loud and clear to President Obama. They said we are done with your policies. We want something very different, because after all in this debt ceiling debate, this wasn’t about default. Remember, the president had no plan. I offered a plan. My plan says we don’t default, but what we do is pay the interest on the debt, our military and senior citizens and prioritize our spending. That’s what Washington is unwilling to do.

Crowley built up to that point with a series of inquiries about why the Tea Party’s popularity is collapsing among Republicans. Bachmann did not point out the obvious media bias in this polling. Was anyone polling the popularity of the Daily Kos/MoveOn/”anti-war” movement on the left in 2004 or 2008? CBS and The New York Times never did! And so it went, with a series of “but, but” questions returning to the poll:

read the full article

bias, crisis, economy, funding, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, nanny state, news media, pandering, politics, propaganda, recession, separation, taxes

Filed under: bias, crisis, economy, funding, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, nanny state, news media, pandering, politics, propaganda, recession, separation, taxes

VA allows guns in bars, finds drop in gun crimes

It Doesn’t Bleed, But Will It Lead?: Richmond Newspaper Finds Drop in Gun Crimes After Va. Allowed Guns in Bars
August 15, 2011 by Ken Shepherd

Here’s a story I don’t expect the media to trumpet, partly because it cuts against the MSM’s preferred narrative on gun laws.

“Virginia’s bars and restaurants did not turn into shooting galleries as some had feared during the first year of a new state law that allows patrons with permits to carry concealed guns into alcohol-serving businesses,” Mark Bowes of the Richmond Times-Dispatch noted in an August 14 story:

read full article

criminal, culture, gun rights, legislation, second amendment

Filed under: criminal, culture, gun rights, legislation, second amendment

A tale of two political movements

After Attacking Tea Party ‘Mobs,’ American Press Try to Understand London’s Rioters
August 15, 2011 by Aubrey Vaughan

Throughout July and early August, during the weeks of an impending budget crisis, Tea Partiers were repeatedly called vile names, from terrorists to delusional children to people strapped with dynamite in the middle of Times Square. The British rioters, who did inflict terror on London, who were typically delusional youth, and who burned down a number of buildings, were instead “disenchanted.”

It seems as though the media mixed their labels on the two activist groups, sympathizing with the rioters while viciously attacking a mainstream and completely non-destructive conservative group. The same sympathy the media felt for the British youth was never applied to the Tea Party, which has always peacefully worked to enact political change.

As Reason’s A. Barton Hinkle explained, the same rhetoric that was used against the Tea Party’s “angry mobs” was suddenly forgotten against the true angry mobs in London.

“Angry mobs” were trying to “destroy president Obama,” fumed Democratic Party leaders back then. “This is something new and ugly,” seethed Paul Krugman of The New York Times, which described the town hall events as “brutal.” No one seemed interested in the root causes of the sign-wavers’ agitation then. You didn’t hear much about the “disillusionment” and “disenchantment” of Tea Party protesters who marched on Washington in September 2009, and again the following March.

This “disillusionment” and “disenchantment” is exactly what the attitudes of the violent British rioters have been excused as, though. Hinkle sarcastically continued,

When conservatives wave signs, it’s not “unrest” caused by a “sense of disenchantment.” It’s because they’re bigots. Society as a whole is not to blame; they are, individually. They need an attitude adjustment. When violent mobs of young people burn down a city, though, they are not individually responsible—society as a whole is (or at least that part of society that ostensibly ticked them off). They don’t need an attitude adjustment: conservatives do.

read full article

abuse, bias, bigotry, bullies, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, political correctness, politics, propaganda, protests, relativism

Filed under: abuse, bias, bigotry, bullies, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, political correctness, politics, propaganda, protests, relativism

Same idea, same newspaper, two different groups, two different narratives

WaPo Double Standard on Modesty: Fashionable for Muslims, Frumpy and Repressive for Christians
August 10, 2011 by Ken Shepherd

Five years ago Post fashion writer Robin Givhan scoffed at the notion of modest swimwear in a July 14, 2006 column “Ultimate Coverup.”

Fast forward to today and the Post’s Alison Lake gave Style section readers a gushy look at how “Muslim women shop for ways to bare little.”

“Web sites offer modest fashions suitable for summer and pool wear,” noted the subheader to Lake’s story.

read full article here

bias, bigotry, culture, discrimination, diversity, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, islam, left wing, liberalism, news media, oppression, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, relativism

Filed under: bias, bigotry, culture, discrimination, diversity, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, islam, left wing, liberalism, news media, oppression, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, relativism

S&P mentions spending as cause of credit downgrade

S&P Lowers America’s Bond Rating, Will Media Mention Spending as a Cause?
August 5, 2011 by Matthew Sheffield

As has been expected, despite the recently reached debt deal, America’s debt got downgraded tonight by credit ratings agency Standard and Poor’s.

In an analysis posted on its website, S&P explicitly stated that it “takes no position on the mix of spending and revenue measures,” however that is a fact that will likely be glossed over by the self-described mainstream media.

There is much more in the analysis, but since you won’t likely see this info in the big media outlets, I am reproducing portions of the report which repeatedly mention excessive spending as a problem:

The outlook on the long-term rating is negative. We could lower the long-term rating to ‘AA’ within the next two years if we see that less reduction in spending than agreed to, higher interest rates, or new fiscal pressures during the period result in a higher general government debt trajectory than we currently assume in our base case. […]

We lowered our long-term rating on the U.S. because we believe that the prolonged controversy over raising the statutory debt ceiling and the related fiscal policy debate indicate that further near-term progress containing the growth in public spending, especially on entitlements, or on reaching an agreement on raising revenues is less likely than we previously assumed and will remain a contentious and fitful process. […]

Republicans and Democrats have only been able to agree to relatively modest savings on discretionary spending while delegating to the Select Committee decisions on more comprehensive measures.[…]

Standard & Poor’s takes no position on the mix of spending and revenue measures that Congress and the Administration might conclude is appropriate for putting the U.S.’s finances on a sustainable footing. […]

Even assuming that at least $2.1 trillion of the spending reductions the act envisages are implemented, we maintain our view that the U.S. net general government debt burden (all levels of government combined, excluding liquid financial assets) will likely continue to grow.

read full article here

So we have the S&P’s report showing that increasing government expenditures are the underlying problem in the current government fiscal crisis. But in progressive land the amount of spending is never the problem; only a lack of revenue can possibly be the problem.

Yahoo: ‘America’s Credit Rating Was Intentionally Sabotaged By Congressional Republicans’
August 6, 2011 by Noel Sheppard

“[I]t’s difficult to escape the conclusion that America’s credit rating was intentionally sabotaged by Congressional Republicans.”

So wrote Yahoo Finance economics editor Daniel Gross Friday evening:

In downgrading the U.S.’s credit rating, S&P points out what has long been obvious: Washington’s inability to come to an agreement on how to close the large fiscal gaps that have emerged since the recession began is troubling. Recent events have sapped the agency’s confidence that the government can and will do what is necessary to align revenues with spending commitments. And it’s difficult to escape the conclusion that America’s credit rating was intentionally sabotaged by Congressional Republicans.

And what’s Gross’s real beef with Republicans? If you guessed “No new taxes,” give yourself a cigar:

Since the Democrats took over Congress in 2007, spending has increased by $1.1 trillion or 41 percent.

If we went back to the exact same outlays called for in that last budget approved by a Republican Congress, we’d actually have a $200 billion surplus in fiscal 2012 based on OMB’s projected tax receipts for that year.

If we adjusted 2007’s spending for inflation, we’d only have a $43 billion deficit next year thereby totally avoiding S&P’s downgrade without raising taxes one cent.

How’s that for simple math, Mr. Economics Editor?

read full article here

bias, budget, congress, crisis, economics, economy, entitlements, funding, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, politics, propaganda, public policy, spending

Filed under: bias, budget, congress, crisis, economics, economy, entitlements, funding, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, politics, propaganda, public policy, spending

Krugman and Kerry both support censorship of opposing views

A recent post expressed concern over whether an endeavor to censor differing views was common among the political left. The hope behind the post was that Paul Krugman would be seen as Orwellian and oppressive. Instead, we now have more leftists parroting the same sentiments: the desire to silence opposing views. Welcome to progressive tolerance.

Sen. Kerry Asks Media to Stop Giving ‘Equal Time or Equal Balance’ to ‘Absurd’ Tea Party Ideas
August 5, 2011 by Noel Sheppard

Last week, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman said conservative views about the debt ceiling should be censored from news reports.

On Friday’s “Morning Joe,” Senator John Kerry (D-Mass.) took this a step further calling on media to stop giving “equal time or equal balance” to Tea Party ideas that people like him consider “absurd” and “not factual”

read the full article and watch the video here

bias, bigotry, budget, bullies, censorship, crisis, Democrats, discrimination, economy, extremism, government, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, oppression, pandering, philosophy, politics, propaganda, relativism

Filed under: bias, bigotry, budget, bullies, censorship, crisis, Democrats, discrimination, economy, extremism, government, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, oppression, pandering, philosophy, politics, propaganda, relativism

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