Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

Purposefully rewriting history at Independence Hall in Philly

Christianity gets flayed at home of Liberty Bell
September 19, 2010 by Bob Unruh

A Christian chaplain has written to officials at the nation’s historic Independence Hall in Philadelphia asking them to provide a better experience for visitors after a tour guide there discounted the Christian beliefs of the Founders, saying, “Washington didn’t even go to church.”

The letter from Pastor Todd DuBord, now the chaplain for the enterprises of actor, martial arts champion and philanthropist Chuck Norris, was sent to the superintendent of Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, where some of the nation’s founding documents were assembled and where the Liberty Bell now is exhibited.

DuBord for years has worked with tours of patriotic citizens who have visited Washington and other locations to see the markers of America’s Christian heritage. He previously exposed when tour guides at the U.S. Supreme Court building were denying the multiple representations there of the Ten Commandments.

He also exposed the agenda at work in the District of Columbia when the replica of the Washington Monument capstone, which is engraved with “Laus Deo,” or “Praise be to God,” was positioned in the visitors’ center so observers were not able to see the inscription.

“The NPS guide went from being an expert on the Founders to someone who was fumbling to formulate his words and get even a coherent and accurate sentence about our Founders’ religion,” DuBord wrote. “It struck me from his initial utterances on their religious views that he knew very little if anything about the real issues at all – and that made me wonder how many presentations he had done over the years to school children and guests from all over the country and world without ever discussing the Founders’ religious nature with any accuracy.”

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Obama admin wanting to scale back free speech?

Elizabeth Warren: First Amendment Right ‘Scares Me’, Needs ‘Dialing Back’
September 23, 2010 by Mark Finkelstein

Remember the MSM brouhaha when some conservatives suggested reconsidering the automatic granting of citizenship to children born in the US to illegal immigrants? Suddenly, the sanctity of the 14th Amendment became the single most precious thing to liberals—even though no amendment of it, let alone its abolition, would have been necessary to revise the policy on birthright citizenship.

So should we expect the liberal media to take up its constitutional cudgel against Elizabeth Warren?  After all, Pres. Obama’s newly appointed [not nominated] head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau went on Morning Joe today and in effect proclaimed that the right to petition government for the redress of government “scares” her.  More disturbingly, Warren suggested we need to work on “dialing back” that right.

To be sure, Warren never cited the First Amendment or the right it recognized to “petition government for a redress of grievances.”  But read and listen to her words: that’s exactly what she was kvetching about—and wanting to “dial back.”

Democrats, constitution, elitism, first amendment, free speech, government, left wing, liberalism, nanny state, philosophy, political correctness, politics, relativism

Filed under: constitution, Democrats, elitism, first amendment, free speech, government, left wing, liberalism, nanny state, philosophy, political correctness, politics, relativism

The Prussian (German) Educational System

Posted on 11/05/1999 05:37:17 PST by majordomo original post can be found here


similar reading:

Separating School & State: How To Liberate American Families

by Sheldon RichmanCommon Core: homogenization is anti-diversity
other reading:

How to Read a Book

by Mortimer J. Adler,
Charles Van DorenDumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling
by John Taylor Gatto

After the defeat of the Prussians (Germans) by Napoleon at the battle of Jena in 1806, it was decided that the reason why the battle was lost was that the Prussian soldiers were thinking for themselves on the battlefield instead of following orders.

The Prussian philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1762-1814), described by many as a philosopher and a transcendental idealist, wrote “Addresses to the German Nation” between 1807 and 1808, which promoted the state as a necessary instrument of social and moral progress. He taught at the University of Berlin from 1810 to his death in 1814. His concept of the state and of the ultimate moral nature of society directly influenced both Von Schelling and Hegel, who took an similarly idealistic view.

Using the basic philosophy prescribing the “duties of the state”, combined with John Locke’s view (1690) that “children are a blank slate” and lessons from Rousseau on how to “write on the slate”, Prussia established a three-tiered educational system that was considered “scientific” in nature. Work began in 1807 and the system was in place by 1819. An important part of the Prussian system was that it defined for the child what was to be learned, what was to be thought about, how long to think about it and when a child was to think of something else. Basically, it was a system of thought control, and it established a penchant in the psyche of the German elite that would later manifest itself into what we now refer to as mind control.

The educational system was divided into three groups. The elite of Prussian society were seen as comprising .5% of the society. Approximately 5.5% of the remaining children were sent to what was called realschulen, where they were partially taught to think. The remaining 94% went to volkschulen, where they were to learn “harmony, obdience, freedom from stressful thinking and how to follow orders.” An important part of this new system was to break the link between reading and the young child, because a child who reads too well becomes knowledgable and independent from the system of instruction and is capable of finding out anything. In order to have an efficient policy-making class and a sub-class beneath it, you’ve got to remove the power of most people to make anything out of available information.

This was the plan. To keep most of the children in the general population from reading for the first six or seven years of their lives.

Now, the Prussian system of reading was originally a system whereby whole sentences (and thus whole integrated concepts) were memorized, rather than whole words. In this three-tier system, they figured out a way to achieve the desired results. In the lowest category of the system, the volkschuelen, the method was to divide whole ideas (which simultaneously integrate whole disciplines – math, science, language, art, etc.) into subjects which hardly existed prior to that time. The subjects were further divided into units requiring periods of time during the day. With appropriate variation, no one would really know what was happening in the world. It was inherently one of the most brilliant methods of knowledge suppression that had ever existed. They also replaced the alphabet system of teaching with the teaching of sounds. Hooked on phonics? Children could read without understanding what they were reading, or all the implications.

In 1814, the first American, Edward Everett, goes to Prussian to get a PhD. He eventually becomes governor of Massachusetts. During the next 30 years or so, a whole line of American dignitaries came to Germany to earn degrees (a German invention). Horace Mann, instrumental in the development of educational systems in America, was among them. Those who earned degrees in Germany came back to the United States and staffed all of the major universities. In 1850, Massachusetts and New York utilize the system, as well as promote the concept that “the state is the father of children.” Horace Mann’s sister, Elizabeth Peabody (Peabody Foundation) saw to it that after the Civil War, the Prussian system (taught in the Northern states) was integrated into the conquered South between 1865 and 1918. Most of the “compulsory schooling” laws designed to implement the system were passed by 1900. By 1900, all the PhD’s in the United States were trained in Prussia. This project also meant that one-room schoolhouses had to go, for it fostered independence. They were eventually wiped out.

One of the reasons that the self-appointed elite brought back the Prussian system to the United States was to ensure a non-thinking work force to staff the growing industrial revolution. In 1776, for example, about 85% of the citizens were reasonably educated and had independent livelihoods – they didn’t need to work for anyone. By 1840, the ratio was still about 70%. The attitude of “learn and then strike out on your own” had to be broken. The Prussian system was an ideal way to do it.

One of the prime importers of the German “educational” system into the United States was William T. Harris, from Saint Louis. He brought the German system in and set the purpose of the schools to alienate children from parental influence and that of religion. He preached this openly, and began creating “school staffing” programs that were immediately picked up by the new “teacher colleges”, many of which were underwritten by the Rockefeller family, the Carnegies, the Whitney’s and the Peabody family. The University of Chicago was underwritten by the Rockefellers.

The bottom line is that we had a literate country in the United States before the importation of the German educational system, designed to “dumb down” the mass population. It was more literate that it is today. The textbooks of the time make so much allusion to history, philosophy, mathematics, science and politics that they are hard to follow today because of the way people are “taught to think.”

Now, part of this whole paradigm seems to originate from an idea presented in The New Atlantis, by Francis Bacon (1627). The work described a “world research university” that scans the planet for babies and talent. The state then becomes invincible because it owned the university. It becomes impossible to revolt against the State because the State knows everything. A reflection of this principle can be seen today with the suppression of radical and practical technologies in order to preserve State control of life and prevent evolution and independence. The New Atlantis was widely read by German mystics in the 19th century. By 1840 in Prussia, there were a lot of “world research universities”, in concept, all over the country. All of them drawing in talent and developiong it for the purposes of State power and stability.

The Birth of Experimental Psychology in Germany

By the middle of the 19th century, Germany had developed a new concept in the sciences which they termed “psycho-physics”, which argued that people were in fact complex machines. It was the ultimate materialist extension of science that would parallel the mechanistic view of the universe already under way. This new view of people became more or less institutionalized in Germany, and by the 1870’s the “field” of experimental psychology was born. The ultimate purpose of experimental psychology was to discover the nature of the human machine and how to program it.

The main proponent of this new experimental psychology in Germany was Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920), who is today widely regarded as the “father” of that field. He is described by orthodoxy as having “freed the study of the mind from metaphysics and rational philosophy.” Presumably in favor of irrational philosophy. Wundt obtained his PhD in medicine from the University of Heidelburg in 1856, and embarked on the study of sensory perception. His most famous work was “Contributions to the Theory of Sense Perception” , done between 1858 and 1862. It is described by orthodoxy as the first work of experimental psychology. In 1875, Wundt was appointed to a chair in philosophy at Leipzig, where he instituted a laboratory for the “systematic, experimental study of experience.” Back then, the phase “get a life” was not in vogue, and evidently he didn’t have much interpretable experience of his own.

In 1873, he began a year-long writing project which resulted in “Principles of Physiological Psychology”, which became a “classic” that was subsequently reprinted through six editions over the next 40 years, establishing psychology’s claim to be an “independent science”. Wundt also wrote on philosophical subjects such as logic and ethics, but as he did not subscribe to “rational philiosophy”, his writings presumably yielded irrational interpretations of both areas. It is conceivable that his warped view of humanity and the universe contributed in some small way to the eventual Nazi penchant for experimenting on those they didn’t like, producing for them an irrational experience they would never forget. American students of Wundt who returned to the United States between 1880 and 1910 became the heads of Psychological Departments at major universities, such as Harvard, Cornell, and the University of Pennsylvania, to name a few. Wundt trained James Cattell, who on his return to the United States trained over 300 PhD’s in the Wundt world view. The system of “educational psychology” evolved from this. Funded by the Carnegie and Rockefeller foundations, the Wundtian system gains control over educational testing in the United States for soldiers of World War I.

The “Educational System” Expands

The wave of immigration which began in 1848, combined with the visibility of revolutions taking place all over Europe, helped foster uncertainty in the public mind. Laws requiring compulsory schooling were then legislated. It was all very Hegelian. We wouldn’t want those little tykes to become reactionaries, would we? In 1890, Carnegie wrote a series of essays called The Gospel of Wrath, in which he claimed that the capitalistic free enterprise system was dead in the United States. It really was, since Carnegie, Rockefeller and Morgan, by then, owned the United States. It was about 1917 that a great “Red Scare” was instituted in the United States in order to set up a reactionary movement intended to get the public to accept the idea of compulsory schooling – Prussian compulsory schooling, of course.

The implimentation of the German educational nightmare in the United States met some initial resistence. In Carnegie’s home town of Gary, Indiana, the system was implemented between 1910 and 1916, mostly through the efforts of William Wirt, the school superintendent. It involved no academic endeavor whatsoever. It worked so well in supplying willing workers for the steel mills that it was decided by Carnegie to bring the system to New York City. In 1917, they initiated a program in New York in 12 schools, with the objective of enlarging the program to encompass 100 schools and eventually all the schools in New York. William Wirt came to supervise the transition.

Unfortunately for Carnegie, the population of the 12 schools was predominently composed of Jewish immigrants, who innately recognized what was being done and the nature of the new “educational system”. Three weeks of riots followed, and editorials in the New York Times were very critical of the plan. Over 200 Jewish school children were thrown in jail. The whole political structure of New York that had tried this scheme were then thrown out of office during the next election. A book describing this scenerio, The Great School Wars, was written by Diane Ravitch on the subject. Curiously, William Wirt was committed to an insane asylum around 1930, after going around making public speeches about his part in a large conspiracy to bring about a controlled state in the hands of certain people. He died two years later.

In order to make sure that the independence of the one-room schoolhouse and the penchant for communities to hire their own independent teachers would cease, the Carnegie group instituted the concept of “teacher certification” – a process controlled by the teaching colleges under Carnegie and Rockefeller control. No one knew that the Communist revolutions were funded from the United States. The buildup of the Soviet Union, as well as that of Nazi Germany, would also be funded later from the United States in order to get a reactionary public to bend to the will of controlling political factions. It was a plan that worked well in the 1920’s, and worked well again in the 1950’s in the psychological creation of the “cold war”, providing funding for the buildup of the military, industrial and pharmaceutical complex. The “non-thinking” American public never suspected a thing. Such a thing would have been “unbelievable.”

Because the United States was owned by wealthy businessmen, a synthetic free enterprise system was created and anti-trust laws were passed to prevent anyone else from gaining power. Everything that had already been consolidated was “grandfathered” out of the law. It was a brilliant scheme, and it worked very well.

Earlier in the century there were “school boards” in every town. Between 1932 and 1960, the number of school boards dropped from 140,000 to 30,000. Today there are about 15,000 – all controlled by extensions of the Carnegie-Rockefeller educational complex. In 1959, with the advent of the “sputnik” and the public realization that “another country was ahead of us”, the embarassed educational system was forced to temporarily create a synthetic focus on science which produced a generation of scientists and technicians in order to resolve the apparent decifit in the public mind.

In retrospect, in 1889 the U.S. Commissioner of Education assured a prominent railroad man, Collis Huntington, when he protested that the schools seemed to be over-educating (producing too many engineers and people who could think), that schools had been scientifically designed not to over-educate. It was a reference to the German system of education inculcated into the United States between 1806 and 1819.


similar reading:

Separating School & State: How To Liberate American Families

by Sheldon RichmanCommon Core: homogenization is anti-diversity
other reading:

How to Read a Book

by Mortimer J. Adler,
Charles Van DorenDumbing Us Down: The Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling
by John Taylor Gatto

Tired of endless failed attempts to reform education?

Separation Between School and State

Promote the Separation Between School and State


children, culture, education, elitism, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, marxism, nanny state, philosophy, political correctness

Filed under: children, culture, education, elitism, government, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, marxism, nanny state, philosophy, political correctness

N-word on TV – Maher vs. Schlessinger

Any one remember way back in August, 2010 when a white woman used the N-word in her radio program and got a lot of heat for it? It’s one thing for our fickle society to detest a particular term when white people use it but have no problem when black people do, but it is an entirely different thing when we exempt certain white people from this anathema.

Maher Charges GOP w/ Racism & Invokes N Word, New Yorkers Should ‘Forget About’ 9/11 Because Mastermind Caught
September 15, 2010 by Brad Wilmouth

Sen. Robert Byrd, ex-Klansman
March 8, 2001 by Michelle Malkin

Schlessinger Sherroded by left wing media

Democrats, bias, bigotry, bullies, culture, diversity, elitism, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, racism, racist, relativism

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Religion of peace stages hate-filled protests, deaths reported

It Begins… 15 Muslims Dead at Anti-Koran Burning Rioting in Kashmir
September 13, 2010 by Gateway Pundit

The Iranians seized on reports of Koran burnings near Ground Zero and elsewhere in the U.S. to fan deadly riots Monday in mostly-Muslim Kashmir.

Indian forces killed more than a dozen people and wounded scores more rampaging rioters, who chanted “Down with Koran desecrators” as they attacked a Christian school in one town and government buildings in other cities.

They also chanted “Down with America” and “Down with Israel,” cries rarely heard in Kashmir where Muslim rebels have long waged a bloody rebellion against Indian rule.

One Muslim was killed in anti-Koran burning protests in Afghanistan on Friday.

More… Muslims torch church in India.

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Filed under: bigotry, extremism, foreign affairs, ideology, intolerance, islam, philosophy, protests, religion

Cuba makes way for capitalism because Marxism failed

MARXISM A BUST… Cuba Lays Off Half a Million – Allows Private Enterprise
September 13, 2010 by Gateway Pundit

Cuba says it will fire at least half a million state workers by mid-2011 and will free up private enterprise to help them find new work – radically remaking employment on the communist island.

The layoffs will start immediately and run through the first half of next year, according to an announcement Monday by the nearly 3 million-strong Cuban Workers Confederation – the only labor union the government tolerates.

To soften the blow, it said the government would authorize simultaneous increases in job opportunities in the non-state sector, allowing more Cubans to become self-employed, to form cooperatives run by employees rather than government bureaucrats and to increase private control of state land and infrastructure through long-term leases.

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What is President Obama thinking?

How Obama Thinks
September 9, 2010 by Dinesh D’Souza

The President isn’t exactly a socialist. So what’s driving his hostility to private enterprise? Look to his roots.

The President’s actions are so bizarre that they mystify his critics and supporters alike. Consider this headline from the Aug. 18, 2009 issue of the Wall Street Journal: “Obama Underwrites Offshore Drilling.” Did you read that correctly? You did. The Administration supports offshore drilling–but drilling off the shores of Brazil. With Obama’s backing, the U.S. Export-Import Bank offered $2 billion in loans and guarantees to Brazil’s state-owned oil company Petrobras to finance exploration in the Santos Basin near Rio de Janeiro–not so the oil ends up in the U.S. He is funding Brazilian exploration so that the oil can stay in Brazil.

More strange behavior: Obama’s June 15, 2010 speech in response to the Gulf oil spill focused not on cleanup strategies but rather on the fact that Americans “consume more than 20% of the world’s oil but have less than 2% of the world’s resources.” Obama railed on about “America’s century-long addiction to fossil fuels.” What does any of this have to do with the oil spill? Would the calamity have been less of a problem if America consumed a mere 10% of the world’s resources?

The oddities go on and on. Obama’s Administration has declared that even banks that want to repay their bailout money may be refused permission to do so. Only after the Obama team cleared a bank through the Fed’s “stress test” was it eligible to give taxpayers their money back. Even then, declared Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, the Administration might force banks to keep the money.

The President continues to push for stimulus even though hundreds of billions of dollars in such funds seem to have done little. The unemployment rate when Obama took office in January 2009 was 7.7%; now it is 9.5%. Yet he wants to spend even more and is determined to foist the entire bill on Americans making $250,000 a year or more. The rich, Obama insists, aren’t paying their “fair share.” This by itself seems odd given that the top 1% of Americans pay 40% of all federal income taxes; the next 9% of income earners pay another 30%. So the top 10% pays 70% of the taxes; the bottom 40% pays close to nothing. This does indeed seem unfair–to the rich.

Obama’s foreign policy is no less strange….
read full article

A good way to discern what motivates Obama is to ask a simple question: What is his dream? Is it the American dream? Is it Martin Luther King’s dream? Or something else?

It is certainly not the American dream as conceived by the founders. They believed the nation was a “new order for the ages.” A half-century later Alexis de Tocqueville wrote of America as creating “a distinct species of mankind.” This is known as American exceptionalism. But when asked at a 2009 press conference whether he believed in this ideal, Obama said no. America, he suggested, is no more unique or exceptional than Britain or Greece or any other country.

Perhaps, then, Obama shares Martin Luther King’s dream of a color-blind society. The President has benefited from that dream; he campaigned as a nonracial candidate, and many Americans voted for him because he represents the color-blind ideal. Even so, King’s dream is not Obama’s: The President never champions the idea of color-blindness or race-neutrality. This inaction is not merely tactical; the race issue simply isn’t what drives Obama.

An odd choice, certainly, as an inspirational hero. But to his son, the elder Obama represented a great and noble cause, the cause of anticolonialism. Obama Sr. grew up during Africa’s struggle to be free of European rule, and he was one of the early generation of Africans chosen to study in America and then to shape his country’s future.

read full article

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News media suddenly finds concern for our troops

Many of you are already familiar with the small Florida church who plans to burn Korans as a public statement.
Burning a Koran is an act of hate, but burning the American flag is not?

We are told Muslims have a right to build a mosque near Ground Zero (which they do) and that this should be the end of the discussion. But since there is a great deal of disapproval of building a mosque this close to Ground Zero the left wing narrative tells us any such disapproval can be explained only by hate – concerns that such a mosque would be interpreted as a triumph of Islam over the Western world are blindly dismissed. The prime objection to the public burning of the Koran by this Florida church is that such an act would only provoke terrorists to hate America more. I’m not sure it’s possible for these Islamic terrorists to hate us more they already do – the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks are a pretty good indication their desire to destroy us is not going to change.

But for some reason our oh-so-caring news media now promote concern for America’s troops. Hmm, that’s a refreshing attitude. Consider the following past news stories.

Manufacturing an Islamophobic crisis – which would foment more hate against the U.S., right?:
105 hate crimes against Muslims equals Islamophobia, but 1,055 against Jews is no big deal
The Myth of an Anti-Muslim Backlash

News stories putting troops at risk:
Senator Bunning: The New York Times Committed Treason
Newsweek’s bogus Koran story

And what does a story look like where journalists cooperated to avoid offending the Muslim world?
CNN’s Iraqi Cover-Up

I personally don’t approve of the Koran burning planned by the small Florida congregation. In making a public statement in the name of Jesus Christ I think it best to make a statement Christ would approve of. I can’t say for certain whether Christ would or would not approve of this Koran burning but it seems to me the latter is more likely the case. However, let us not gloss over the profound hypocrisy in condemning the Koran burning by the very people who condemn any opposition to the Ground Zero mosque. If it is un-American to dismiss religious freedom in one situation it should be un-American to do the same in another. If we can claim condemning the Koran burning is not violating religious freedom we can legitimately claim the same thing for condemning the Ground Zero mosque. Why would so many supporters of the Ground Zero mosque refrain from commenting on the “wisdom” of it yet feel free to comment on the wisdom of publicly burning Korans as protest?

President Obama declined to comment on the “wisdom” of building a mosque so close to Ground Zero but merely affirmed the right of Muslims to build it. So did he employ the same diplomatic tolerance toward the Koran burning?
Obama urges Fla. pastor to call off Koran burning
September 9, 2010 by William Branigin

bias, first amendment, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, news media, political correctness, propaganda, protests, relativism, religion, scandal, troops

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105 hate crimes against Muslims equals Islamophobia, but 1,055 against Jews is no big deal

Inconvenient Truth: 10 Times More Hate Crimes Against Jews Than Muslims
September 6, 2010 by Noel Sheppard

If you believed the media, you would think that hate crimes against Muslims was a growing epidemic in America.

Just Monday, the New York Times had a front page story hysterically noting a “torrent of anti-Muslim sentiments and a spate of vandalism.”

“The knifing of a Muslim cab driver in New York City has also alarmed many American Muslims,” wrote Laurie Goodstein in the second paragraph of her article titled “American Muslims Ask, Will We Ever Belong?”

Unfortunately, as Michael Doyle reported on August 28, the most recent data concerning hate crimes in this country paint a very different picture than what Goodstein and others in the media have been dishonestly portraying of late:

bias, bigotry, bullies, culture, diversity, hate crime, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, relativism, religion

Filed under: bias, bigotry, bullies, culture, diversity, hate crime, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, relativism, religion

Burning a Koran is an act of hate, but burning the American flag is not?

CNN’s Chetry to Koran-Burning Pastor: You’ll Have Blood on Your Hands
September 7, 2010 by Matthew Balan

On Tuesday’s American Morning, CNN’s Kiran Chetry used General David Petraeus’s denunciation of a planned Koran burning by a church to blast the church’s pastor for any subsequent deaths of U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan: “Are you willing to have the blood of soldiers on your hands by this demonstration?” Chetry also lectured Pastor Terry Jones over his apparent lack of “refined” Christianity.

Chetry interviewed Pastor Jones 41 minutes into the 7 am Eastern hour. After asking him why he and his church were planning to burn Korans, the anchor launched into her critique of the minister: “I wanted to let you say your piece, because when I first read this story, I thought there’s no way that this could be as bad as it sounds. It appears that it is. You’re saying that you’re going to burn the holy book of another religion to send a message to the radical elements of that religion, with no thought to the fact that you’d obviously be highly offending everyone in that religion. How do you justify that?”

Later in the segment, Chetry turned theologian and quoted Scripture to Pastor Jones as she continued to question his planned action: “What about turn thy cheek? I mean, this is- you know, Christianity at its most- you know, refined. It’s that you just don’t act out in violence. You don’t act out in any manner of hate, that you turn thy cheek, that you don’t rise to the nastiness or the level of payback that your perceived enemies do. I mean, isn’t this the exact opposite of what Christ taught all of us to be and to do?”

bias, bigotry, christian, diversity, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, islam, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, philosophy, political correctness, propaganda, relativism, religion

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