Uncommon Sense

politics and society are, unfortunately, much the same thing

Remember in November 2020 – playing cards

You know as well as I do the American political dynamic has reached new levels of insanity. More than one person I follow has commented on this upon returning to the US after traveling abroad. Tensions are high. Many people are concerned about the 2020 election and a lot of attention and money are spent on it. As we know, our leaders affect our nation, thus elections matter.

Most of us want sanity to return. It’s relatively few who are stoking the fire and gaslighting the culture, but that number is growing. Those who want to help reclaim sanity but don’t want to hustle and tussle with potentially violent leftists can take a more subtle approach. Public awareness is essential in a society like ours, especially around election time. Introducing the Remember in November 2020 Edition playing cards.

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Filed under: campaign, culture, right wing

Maybe Trump voters understand more than his haters realize

original article: Understanding Why Religious Conservatives Would Vote for Trump
February 10, 2020 by Andrew T. Walker

It’s a complicated situation for religious conservatives. But these are complicated times.

In January 2021, someone will take the presidential oath of office, and religious conservatives will undoubtedly play a crucial role in whom it will be. Their influence will be the focus of an untold number of postmortems, of the type they’ve been accustomed to hearing since 2016, when the notorious “81 percent” of evangelicals voted for the unlikeliest of candidates: Donald Trump. There are two competing interpretations of Trump’s enthusiastic support from religious conservatives: that it is a lesser-of-two-evils transaction based on self-interest, or that it shows a voting bloc compromised by every form of democratic vice, whether racism, nativism, or nationalism.

If trends hold, there will be a similar turnout in 2020. Rather than wait for the postmortem, I can tell you what will happen now: Millions of religious conservatives will approach their votes with a political realism that requires balancing undesirable tensions and conflicting realities. They will vote not so much for Donald Trump — with his uncouth speech and incessantly immature tweets — as they will vote against the worldview of the Democratic platform. Those who make this calculation are not sell-outs, nor have they forfeited the credibility of their values carte blanche. For blind allegiance does not explain the voting relationship. That religious conservatives are not progressives does. Between Never Trump and Always Trump is a third category: Reluctant Trump. Voters in this category don’t get the fair hearing they deserve, since they defy the simple binary portrayal of religious conservatives as either offended by Trump or sold out to him.

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Filed under: campaign, christian, conservative, culture, government, opinion, patriotism, philosophy, politics, Republicans, right wing

Revisiting a bad faith media narrative on the Covington Catholic story

original article: A Year Ago, the Media Mangled the Covington Catholic Story. What Happened Next Was Even Worse.
January 21, 2020 by ROBBY SOAVE

Journalists and pundits who frantically doubled down on their initial bad takes deserve more criticism.

On the weekend of January 18, 2019, a short video appeared on Twitter that purported to show a group of Catholic high school boys—one young man, Nicholas Sandmann, in particular—harassing a Native American elder named Nathan Phillips on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

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Filed under: abuse, bias, corruption, current events, diversity, ethics, fraud, ideology, indoctrination, intolerance, left wing, liberalism, lies, news media, pandering, political correctness, progressive, propaganda, protests, racism, racist, scandal, victimization

Does locking people into dependence expand choice?

original article: How Government Paid Leave Restricts Parents’ Choices
January 21, 2020 by Georgi Boorman

“People say, ‘I just need to organize my life like this and make the right choices,’” Claire Cain Miller quoted from feminist author Kirsten Swinth in The New York Times recently. “Nobody’s saying, ‘I’m making choices in an impoverished world.’” The article for the New York Times’ “The Upshot” purports to examine the challenges parents face in balancing work and child-rearing.

Cain Miller operates from the premise that the United States — one of the wealthiest countries in the history of the world — is “impoverished” in parental choices. From the author’s view, parents’ limited options are due to institutional policy deficiencies, such as a lack of government-provided parental leave, meager paid leave from employers, and “gendered expectations.” If it weren’t for these “structural limitations,” the implied argument goes, American parents would face a rich selection of choices for work-life balance.

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Filed under: culture, economics, family, feminism, freedom, government, nanny state, public policy, reform, unintended consequences, victimization, welfare

A closer look at how education funding REALLY works

original article: I’m an Educator Who Disagrees with Teacher Walkouts
January 18, 2020 by Ajalon J. Stapley

This is a post from my blog that I wrote back in 2018 when the “Red for Ed” frenzy, to increase Arizona’s education funding, was happening.

I’m an educator with a different perspective from what you probably see in the media regarding Red for Ed protests. I worked in public schools for 12 years, as an afterschool provider, teacher, administrator and more. I’ve taught in three states and don’t claim to be an expert in everything education, but I have my experiences, and don’t agree with what’s happening. Let me explain.

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Filed under: children, crisis, culture, education, family, funding, public policy, tragedy, unintended consequences

Moral credibility hangs in the balance

original article: Black Demagogues and Pseudo-Scholars
July 20, 1992

During the past decade, the historic relationship between African Americans and Jewish Americans — a relationship that sponsored so many of the concrete advances of the civil rights era — showed another and less attractive face.

While anti-Semitism is generally on the wane in this country, it has been on the rise among black Americans. A recent survey finds not only that blacks are twice as likely as whites to hold anti-Semitic views but — significantly — that it is among the younger and more educated blacks that anti-Semitism is most pronounced.

The trend has been deeply disquieting for many black intellectuals. But it is something most of us, as if by unstated agreement, simply choose not to talk about. At a time when black America is beleaguered on all sides, there is a strong temptation simply to ignore the phenomenon or treat it as something strictly marginal. And yet to do so would be a serious mistake. As the African-American philosopher Cornel West has insisted, attention to black anti-Semitism is crucial, however discomfiting, in no small part because the moral credibility of our struggle against racism hangs in the balance.

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Filed under: american, bigotry, culture, demographics, discrimination, diversity, extremism, opinion, racism, victimization

What the NYT used to say about the minimum wage

original article: The Right Minimum Wage: $0.00
January 14, 1987

The Federal minimum wage has been frozen at $3.35 an hour for six years. In some states, it now compares unfavorably even with welfare benefits available without working. It’s no wonder then that Edward Kennedy, the new chairman of the Senate Labor Committee, is being pressed by organized labor to battle for an increase.

No wonder, but still a mistake. Anyone working in America surely deserves a better living standard than can be managed on $3.35 an hour. But there’s a virtual consensus among economists that the minimum wage is an idea whose time has passed. Raising the minimum wage by a substantial amount would price working poor people out of the job market. A far better way to help them would be to subsidize their wages or – better yet – help them acquire the skills needed to earn more on their own.

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Filed under: capitalism, economics, government, poverty, public policy, reform, unintended consequences

The dehumanizing effects of the fear of failure

original article: The Deadly Dance of Perfectionism: How the Rhetoric of Family Planning Hurts Children
November 21, 2019 by Susan Martin

As a child, I never knew exactly what my dad did, but I knew that his office was the first place where I had ever seen anatomical pink and magenta models of the uterus and the embryo. I remember sitting with my mother in our family station wagon and looking up into the exotic jungle of scarlet bougainvillea that pressed against the glass of his beautiful corner office, displaying its deeply ridged flowers, just like the pink plastic model.

My father and I used to race each other up the stairs of the Population Center, and I remember the feeling of my heart pounding in my chest as I reached the last step before he did. I would triumphantly turn around and wait for his brown shoes and white cotton socks to appear on the top step before jumping out so that he could pretend to be surprised. Beating my father up the stairs confirmed my feeling that someone wanted me. I was strong and fast, and thus worthy of my father’s love. (Later, this would develop into a mania for long-distance running and endurance training.)

“Wantedness” was originally a term coined to describe a mother’s attitude toward the birth of a child. Sociologists decided that the degree to which a birth was wanted could be measured by accounting for less than perfect timing, less than perfect finances, or simply emotional hesitancy on the part of the mother. Yet its wider applications had more to do with phenomenology than with science. It could describe a person’s value in the social economy and the environmental factors limiting that value.

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Filed under: abortion, biology, children, culture, eugenics, family, feminism, health, ideology, philosophy, sex, unintended consequences

Does AFP’s sloppy reporting reveal bias?

On Monday, November 18, the AFP published a “Breaking” news story about more than 100,000 migrant children being detained by US immigration services. By Wednesday, the story has been deleted. Why would the AFP scrap a story after two days? It turns out a vital piece of information was neglected in the original story: the main premise was wrong.

AFP deleted a story incorrectly accusing the Trump administration of detaining over 100,000 migrant children

Searching online for an extant copy of the original AFP story (authored by Ben Simon and Nina Larson) shows the initial story highlighted a recent UN report on migrant children detained in over 80 countries across the world. But the AFP story focused on how the US handles these children, and more specifically, it blamed the sad situation on president Trump.

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Filed under: bias, children, hypocrisy, immigration, left wing, liberalism, news media, president, progressive, propaganda, public policy, relativism, separation

Does University culture think racism is sometimes okay?

The University of Alabama recently found itself undesirably in the spotlight again when an administrator of high standing lost his job at the institution. The essence of the matter appears to be that Dr. Jamie R. Riley, dean of students and assistance vice president of student life, resigned from UA in a mutual agreement with the institution after some allegedly racist social media comments of his publically surfaced.

The Tuscaloosa News has two stories about the incident published Sep. 13 and Sep. 18, both written by Ed Enoch. The earlier story focuses on student reaction to Riley’s resignation, the latter focuses on the UA Faculty Senate’s reaction. While some details on the initial comments are mentioned, neither story focuses much attention on the controversial comments that serve as the catalyst for the entire situation.

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Filed under: bigotry, diversity, education, hate speech, hypocrisy, ideology, indoctrination, left wing, liberalism, news media, pandering, political correctness, progressive, propaganda, racism, racist, relativism, scandal

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